24 3 / 2014

Anonymous asked: Hi I want to quote your zine "transcending Anatomy" in something I am writing and so wanted to credit you - but don't see your name anywhere. Do you prefer to be anonymous? I thank you so much for your work. All good wishes, Caffyn Jesse

I prefer for the zine to be credited just as Transcending Anatomy, but if you need to cite a specific individual as the creator, you can use the name Eli Aaron. Thanks!

03 3 / 2014

transfeminism:

Sylvia Rivera is one of my dyke heroes! The above pictures are of Sylvia Rivera with her wife Julia Murray. While people are quick to talk about Sylvia Rivera’s life, I never, ever hear anyone acknowledge that Sylvia was in a relationship with another women. It would seem that not all parts of her life are given equal respect and attention.

As a trans woman who loves women, it means something important to me personally to know that Sylvia Rivera was in a relationship with another woman. I’ve been made to feel isolated by others because I’m a trans woman who loves women. I’ve had the term “kai kai” disparagingly thrown in my direction on more than one occasion.

Trans women loving other women is treated as taboo by many in the “community.” There is some serious hostility directed at trans women who love women from some trans and queer people (I’m not even talking about gaystream LGB people). That is, some of those very same people who routinely evoke Sylvia Rivera’s name so often are the same people who take issue with trans women loving other women.

13 2 / 2014

love-mhz:

lisaquestions:

lisaquestions:

Is this Redefining Realness?

I actually checked the original post and the tags are #Janet Mock #Redefining Realness #redefiningrealness 
So yeah, it is.

Here is the page on google books FWIW.

[The image is a photograph of a page from a book. The text reads:
"Gender and gender identity, sex and sexuality, are spheres of self-discovery that overlap and relate but are not one and the same. Each and every one of us has a sexual orientation and a gender identity. Simply put, our sexual orientation has to do with whom we get into bed with, while our gender identity has to do with whom we get into bed as. A trans person can be straight, gay, bisexual, etc.; a cis gay, lesbian, or heterosexual person can conform to expected gender norms or not; and a woman can have a penis and a man can have a vagina. There is no formula when it comes to gender and sexuality. Yet it is often only people whose gender identity and/or sexual orientation negates society’s heteronormative and cisnormative standards who are targets of stigma, discrimination, and violence. I wish that instead of investing in these hierarchies of what’s right and who’s wrong, what’s authentic and who’s not, and ranking people according to these rigid standards that ignore diversity in our genders and sexualities, we gave people freedom and resources to define, determine, and declare who they are."]

love-mhz:

lisaquestions:

lisaquestions:

Is this Redefining Realness?

I actually checked the original post and the tags are #Janet Mock #Redefining Realness #redefiningrealness 

So yeah, it is.

Here is the page on google books FWIW.

[The image is a photograph of a page from a book. The text reads:

"Gender and gender identity, sex and sexuality, are spheres of self-discovery that overlap and relate but are not one and the same. Each and every one of us has a sexual orientation and a gender identity. Simply put, our sexual orientation has to do with whom we get into bed with, while our gender identity has to do with whom we get into bed as. A trans person can be straight, gay, bisexual, etc.; a cis gay, lesbian, or heterosexual person can conform to expected gender norms or not; and a woman can have a penis and a man can have a vagina. There is no formula when it comes to gender and sexuality. Yet it is often only people whose gender identity and/or sexual orientation negates society’s heteronormative and cisnormative standards who are targets of stigma, discrimination, and violence. I wish that instead of investing in these hierarchies of what’s right and who’s wrong, what’s authentic and who’s not, and ranking people according to these rigid standards that ignore diversity in our genders and sexualities, we gave people freedom and resources to define, determine, and declare who they are."]

(Source: oldfilmsflicker)

12 2 / 2014

rambleonamazon:

I literally drew this entire comic just for that last panel…

Happy Valentines Day, everyone!

(via sbearbergman)

10 2 / 2014

allycookies:

Cis people - pansexuality is not defined as “men, women, and trans people”. Trans people are not an inherently separate gender category. If you really want to describe your sexuality in this way, I recommend “men, women, and nonbinary people”. Or, you could just say “all people”. Separating binary trans people from binary cis people is transphobic and gross and just don’t do it.

(via thesexosaurus)

09 2 / 2014

allthevalidation:

Lately, I’ve been thinking about privilege. 
There’s a ton of things I could talk about regarding privilege, but right now I’m focusing on my privilege as a cisgender person within my relationship with a transsexual man. 

There are some things my partner is going through, will go through, and has gone through that I can never really understand.
I can’t really understand what it’s like to have dysphoria, or to have to change my name, or have to get surgery to live with my body. 

So honestly, there are times when the best thing I can do is to just listen.And yeah, sometimes I feel like this isn’t enough, like I should be doing something more, or working harder to understand. And I do work to be in an understanding place. I read articles by other individuals, I ask other people questions (respectfully), I Google a LOT - and all of this has value.

But at the end of the day, I can’t erase the fact that my partner is experiencing something I can’t/won’t experience, and the best authority on his experience is him.
No amount of research and/or understanding is going to erase the fact I have cis privilege. Nor should it. 

My being cis means that there are things I can’t understand. 
And that’s alright, but I have to understand that and respect my limitations and privilege in some conversations/spaces

There isn’t really a point to this post, I have just been thinking lately. 

08 2 / 2014

Anonymous asked: I remember Buck Angel mentioning that those who go on testosterone should use estrogen cream on their genitals to keep them healthy. Is this true?

ftmsextalk:

I have never heard of this

-Chase

Estrogen creams or suppositories are often recommended for folks who’ve been on T for a while and are dealing with atrophy downstairs. It can help resolve issues like pain with penetration, excessive dryness, bleeding, and recurring infections. There’s some information about it on p. 55 of Nick Gorton’s book Medical Therapy and Health Maintenance for Transgender Men (pdf), which is free online and a great general resource.

27 1 / 2014

thesexosaurus:

1. “Do you like when I…?”
2. “I like when you…”
3. “Will you…?”
4. “How does this feel?”
5. “Do you want me to…?”
6. “Do you want to…?”
7. “Is there anything you want to try?”
8. “Show me what you like.”
9. “Do you want to go further?”
10. “Do you want to stop?”
11. “Can I…?”
12. “Does this feel good?”
13. “Are you happy?”
14. “Are you comfortable?”
15. “Are you having a good time?”
16. “Is this good for you?”

My favorite thing about this list: the mix of statements, open-ended questions, and yes-or-no questions.

(Source: 16-secrets)

25 1 / 2014

genderedintelligence:

‘Domestic Violence: A resource for trans people’ was produced in 2009 by The Greater London Domestic Violence project, in collaboration with the LGBT Domestic Abuse Forum and NHS Barking & Dagenham.
The resource has been written primarily to assist trans people who experience domestic abuse. There is information as well as links to UK resources.
To view the full booklet, click here.

Rates of domestic violence are particularly high for trans people, especially folks who are young and/or living with chronic illness or disability. This booklet is an excellent resource with great explanations of how gender can become a tool for partner abuse.

genderedintelligence:

‘Domestic Violence: A resource for trans people’ was produced in 2009 by The Greater London Domestic Violence project, in collaboration with the LGBT Domestic Abuse Forum and NHS Barking & Dagenham.

The resource has been written primarily to assist trans people who experience domestic abuse. There is information as well as links to UK resources.

To view the full booklet, click here.

Rates of domestic violence are particularly high for trans people, especially folks who are young and/or living with chronic illness or disability. This booklet is an excellent resource with great explanations of how gender can become a tool for partner abuse.

(via thesexosaurus)

24 1 / 2014

linearbbq:

A bunch of articles with titles like “Gonorrhea superbug may be deadlier than AIDS!” keep popping up on my dash. They all seem to trace back to this CNBC article, which was published last May; who knows why it’s become so popular again. The thought of a strain of gonorrhea that is highly contagious and worse than AIDS is terrifying… but it’s also completely bogus. Here’s why:

The article’s “expert” isn’t one:Alan Christianson, the person quoted in the article is a naturopath, not a medical doctor. His specialty is “natural endocrinology” and he doesn’t appear to have any particular background in infectious disease or sexual health. (source)

So far, cases of antibiotic-resistant gonorrhea are very isolated: H041, the strain of gonorrhea that is resistant to all current antibiotic treatments, has only been reported in one person, in Japan (source). There are other strains of gonorrhea that are resistant to one or more antibiotics, and this is a growing problem, but they can still be treated with alternate antibiotic regimens (source).

Antibiotic-resistant gonorrhea is not known to be more virulent: Christianson says that “the [antibiotic-resistant gonorrhea] bacteria is more aggressive and will affect more people quickly… Getting gonorrhea from this strain might put someone into septic shock and death in a matter of days.” There have been no reported deaths from H041 (even the CNBC article admits this), and I can’t find any other sources saying that it’s any more virulent than other strains of gonorrhea.

Gonorrhea virtually never causes death from septic shock: Gonorrhea can enter the bloodstream and lead to widespread infection; this is called gonococcemia or disseminated gonococcal infection, and it happens in 0.5-3% of gonorrhea cases (source). This is not the same as septic shock. While gonococcemia can lead to septic shock and death, it is exceedingly rare — only two deaths have ever been reported, here and here.

Gonorrhea is nothing like AIDS: The death rate from untreated AIDS is 98%. The death rate from untreated gonorrhea is 1%. (source)

The truth about gonorrhea: Gonorrhea is the second most commonly-reported infectious disease in the United States. People with gonorrhea may show symptoms, but are also likely to be asymptomatic; it is generally easily cured with a single dose of antibiotics, but if left untreated, it can lead to infertility and increased risk of HIV transmission. The best way to avoid gonorrhea is to use barriers like condoms and dental dams for penetration and for oral sex. Testing for gonorrhea involves a urine sample or a simple swab; some clinics will even let you do your own swab so you don’t have to have an exam.

ThinkProgress, Planned Parenthood, and the Centers for Disease Control have all published much more accurate stories about drug-resistant gonorrhea. The take-home message? Antibiotic resistance is a major and growing problem, and it’s a good idea to avoid gonorrhea. But antibiotic-resistant gonorrhea is not a lethal superbug, and it doesn’t do any good to spread a nonsense rumor in the name of sex ed — especially one that’s been turned into a scare tactic or a political issue.